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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 2:27 pm 
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ash floating in the back yard....looks like snow. surreal.

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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:03 pm 
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Location: Harris 2020
Some good news for my mom's place. This is about a mile from her house back the other direction from where the car is driving. There's still another fire up on the hill to the left of this road that could still potentially threaten her house if the winds pick up again. So they're not out of the woods. But this is huge that this one didn't hit em.

https://www.facebook.com/SonomaIndexTribune/videos/10155481430735041/?hc_ref=ARTo4olexq5dWoFZkSx2G-Fi-5xKe-VoQH0mFa0MNzWwGmTHsWdSlSVoZsAZFtvl52o


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 1:33 pm 
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Location: Harris 2020
this is from the new yorker. but it, somehow, nails what the community is like.


Quote:
The fires started late Sunday night, though I’d seen a fat gray cloud of smoke on Sunday afternoon, out near Napa County Airport. It was a hot day, after a dry, hot summer, with no humidity. Hurricane-force winds kicked up after sunset, the screens knocked from the windows. Some people were awake when the first reports came in, but I went to bed early, still on New York time. My sister woke me up at 3 a.m. with the news that there were multiple fires, spanning Sonoma and Napa Counties; the wind had caused them to spread over thousands of acres in just a few hours. Already, houses were gone, wineries were gone, vineyards were scorched or had disappeared.
In Sonoma County, more than most places, people make their living from the land—it’s an agricultural area, with old dairy farms alongside vineyards, now existing side by side with cannabis farms on the brink of legality. It’s a place where people know how to protect their land, know how to dig fire lines and remove brush, hose the perimeter. But there was no warning, no chance to prepare. The fires, which have burned nearly two hundred thousand acres across the state, got so big, so quickly, that the understanding was that firefighters were not trying to save property; they were trying only to save lives.
My family left Sonoma that first day, driven by the smoke, and sheltered in Petaluma, with a rotating group of twenty or so others. Two of them had lost their homes. One woman paced outside, on the phone to her son on the East Coast, who was monitoring the condition of her house via satellite. Another family had driven out of town at 2 a.m., heading for the ocean, where they huddled at a picnic table on the beach, playing rummy by flashlight. A harvest intern, visiting from Chile, had no car and no place to go; she was dropped off by a fellow-intern who was heading south to stay with friends.
In the shelter, there are ten dogs knocking around, the radio cuts in and out, the constant ping of text messages announces new evacuation notices, arriving on everyone’s phones at the same time. We hear that my uncle’s house is gone; he sends photos of a black square of land, piles of ash. A stable spray-paints its phone number on the horses and sets them loose, the flames too close to safely move the animals. There are conflicting reports: Fremont Diner is gone; Fremont Diner is fine. When the Internet cuts out, friends in New York monitor the situation for me, calling with updates. When we’re able to check the fire reports online, the fires are at zero-per-cent containment. The next day, the same. The next, three-per-cent containment.
It can feel odd, a disaster in slow motion—there are lull periods, nothing to do, no one outside. The air quality in Sonoma County is the worst ever recorded; everyone breathes hotly into white paper masks. Ash blows silently through the air—open your car door and ash flutters off, run your windshield wipers and ash becomes paste. We return to Sonoma to deliver goods to the evacuation center at the high school, where three hundred people are sheltering. At the Kaiser offices in Petaluma, picking up medication needed at the shelter, we find out that most of the doctors on call have lost their homes. They’ve been awake for thirty hours or more.
Driving through downtown Sonoma, the sun is orange through the smoke. Cars stream out of town in bumper-to-bumper traffic, possessions piled on car roofs and in truck beds, the drivers wearing the white masks. There’s a strange normalcy to parts of downtown—the bakery open, cars parked in the square—though the National Guard is set up at the high school, ready for possible evacuation, and bulldozers are digging twenty-foot trenches in the cemetery above town, hoping to stall the approaching flames. Sirens cut in and out. An elderly woman, mask on, sweatshirt hood up, walks her Italian greyhound through the high-school parking lot.

Back at the house, there’s a kind of stunned apprehension, life on hold. My sister wakes up at 5 a.m. to go work for a few hours in the lab at a winery; the other lab tech can’t make it through, owing to road closures, but someone has to test the twenty tons of grapes that are still coming in. My other sister is called in to work at another winery—they aren’t requiring people to come in, but there’s a very real sense that the future of the winery depends on how much of the wine they can salvage in the next few days.
Part of what will hit the wine industry so hard, and what will affect the community that depends on that industry, is that these fires came during harvest, when tons of grapes are being processed each day. In Sonoma Valley, the harvest was about ninety-per-cent complete—the thinner-skinned grape varietals, like Pinots and Chardonnays, were already picked, already in tanks. But Napa is known for its Cabernet Sauvignon, a grape that ripens later. Most of that crop is still on the vine. If the vineyards are not gone entirely, smoke taint can claim the remaining vines. Even if a winery’s grapes were harvested before the fires, winemakers are struggling to maintain the fermenting juice. The tanks might need attention two or three times a day, if not more; without constant management, the juice can basically boil, the ferment killing itself. The temperature isn’t controlled. Mold can be a problem. The resulting wine is salvageable, barely—or not.
That’s why, despite evacuation orders, so many people we know are staying behind. They’re trying to save the wine, which might represent two years of harvests. People stay awake all night, putting out hot spots. People sneak past police barriers to check on tanks and marijuana crops, moving out as much of the harvest as possible before it becomes untenable or even more unsafe. Sonoma County has always been a peculiarly balanced ecosystem: farmers, vintners, workers, cannabis growers, hippies in West County, young families in Petaluma. Even before the fire, there was a housing shortage, and huge wealth stratification. The fires are equal opportunity: one of the fancier neighborhoods in Santa Rosa, Fountaingrove Parkway, is gone, as is Coffey Lane, a working-class neighborhood.
When a community’s identity was already in transition, who determines what direction to go in when rebuilding begins? Those who were living on the fringes will be more at risk. Our friends have a month-old baby; their house is gone. They were living in a converted warehouse, without insurance. If you were waiting for imminent changes in the law to legitimize your marijuana crops, there’s no way to cover your losses, either. Beyond the property, the loss of life, there’s the sense that Sonoma County’s very identity is threatened by these fires, in ways we can’t yet see.
I’m comforted by the particular Sonoma County flavor to the help offered: free coops for evacuee chickens, acupuncture available in shelters, stress remedies from the local herbal-studies school. Back-yard farmers coördinate on social media to gather produce for displaced families. A local winemaker posts a video of “Waiting for a Miracle,” by the Jerry Garcia Band, on Twitter. This is what I hope doesn’t disappear, doesn’t get crowded out by the new economic reality forged on the other side of the fires.
We are waiting out another day, with word that two fires threatening downtown Sonoma have merged. There is no end in sight. We refresh the maps. We listen to the radio. We hope for no wind.



https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/fleeing-the-fires-in-sonoma-county?mbid=social_twitter


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:20 pm 
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Not sure if it was posted but there is a story of an elderly married couple that jumped in their pool to escape the fire
they were in there something like 6 hours
as the danger passed the woman passed away in his arms

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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:22 pm 
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There's two of those stories...one they both lived...one in which the wife died

This was the local couple who lived..


http://www.latimes.com/local/abcarian/l ... story.html

Here is the harder one about tourists where wife died..

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/F ... 274789.php


Last edited by paschutt on Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:24 pm 
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Heard about the one where they lived

It only reinforces my opinion that backyard pools are awesome


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:28 pm 
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Location: Corner of 5th and the milkyway
sad

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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 6:20 pm 
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I’m headed to Santa Rosa in the morning for work related to the fire. Should be interesting.


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 7:06 pm 
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paschutt wrote:
There's two of those stories...one they both lived...one in which the wife died

This was the local couple who lived..


http://www.latimes.com/local/abcarian/l ... story.html

Here is the harder one about tourists where wife died..

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/F ... 274789.php


That second one is right down the road from the house my dad built in 91. That whole hill is devastated.


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 1:46 pm 
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Location: Harris 2020
Any other updates? Knightline, bearcobb, your family homes make it?

My step dad drove up to Sonoma yesterday to try and get to his house. But they wouldn't let him thru the roadblock. However, we can confirm that the house is still standing. But we still don't know how long until they're going to be able to go home. Hearing lots of conflicting reports. Maybe a couple days, maybe a week, maybe more? They're getting really ansy, they really want to go home. Our 4-legged refugees, however, are doing just fine. (you can tell which ones the alpha-dog of the pack)

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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:09 pm 
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The place my dad and his wife live in now is by the county fair and he said that he was pretty sure it was OK. The previous place is gone for sure and the one by Annandale is too (the one before the previous place). Apparently those are separate fires.


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 4:24 pm 
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I was in Santa Rosa working all weekend. Saturday morning, I could see the the fire 1 ridge over. It was surreal.

The businesses in town were basically shut down. They either had power or gas. Not both .

I ate at in n out 2 days I a row because it was the only thing open.


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:11 pm 
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parents returned home today. everything is good. first responders are da shit.


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:54 pm 
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Location: There won't be nothin' but big old hearts dancin' in our eyes.
Is there any containment now?

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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:58 pm 
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Yes...like 60 to 80% depending which of the 7 fires ...they're estimating 100% by friday


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 8:01 pm 
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Heavy vibes round these parts

Something like 3500 homes destroyed. Over 1/4 of the population evacuated, 90k.

Community support is overwhelming...most shelters denying donations due to too much


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 8:02 pm 
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Location: There won't be nothin' but big old hearts dancin' in our eyes.
Wow, first responders are so incredible.

XO.

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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 9:07 pm 
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It's amazing how there are like a half million people in the area now. Just crazy how much devastation.

Nature is just on a fucking tear this year.


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 12:34 pm 
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My parents got to go home this morning. They were only here for 8 days, but it felt like like a month. What a crazy time.


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 12:38 pm 
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mr_bearcobb wrote:
It's amazing how there are like a half million people in the area now. Just crazy how much devastation.

Nature is just on a fucking tear this year.


sadly it's just the start. So much of california (really west coast) has been developed closer and closer to wild lands that tend to go unkept. How many people actually have 100yards of defensible space or know to have that? Having recently been near a transformer explosion, all you need is the right weather (ie every summer now), deteriorating infrastructure, one down transformer and boom here you go. It's a miracle that more land didn't catch...theres a whole huge swath of land South/West of Santa Rosa that didn't catch, that if it does would mean big problems for Sonoma.


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 12:41 pm 
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Rockhound wrote:
My parents got to go home this morning. They were only here for 8 days, but it felt like like a month. What a crazy time.


glad things are alright. our family is very thankful...my parents place in sonoma and my uncle's place in Yountville were too close.

Part of the reason i left yosemite was the fires were just getting too crazy and having months of poor air was just no bueno. My parents didn't quite get my concerns when they moved out here, but they get it now. They're going to be attached to an N95 for a bit now.


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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Fri Oct 20, 2017 3:19 pm 
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klay might be my favorite human



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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Fri Oct 20, 2017 4:11 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: North Bay fire
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 1:45 pm 
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Location: I'm still walkin', so I'm sure that I can dance
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